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Voki Tip of the Week: Adding Voki on Canvas

November 18, 2014

Many educators asked us if there is a way to add Voki to their Canvas account/assignments to help enhance their students learning experience. Well, we did find a way to do so and it is very easy! Just follow these steps and you will have a Voki added in no time:

1. Go on voki.com

2. Publish your Voki.

3. Select your Voki size.

4. Click to copy your Voki embed code.

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5. Go into your Canvas account and find your course.

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6. Find your assignment.

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7. Click HTML Editor.

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8. Paste Voki Embed code into the editor.

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9. Add “s” after all http.

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10. Save or publish your assignment.

11. Your Voki will be added to your Canvas Assignment!

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Easy right? Have fun and enjoy!

Until next time,

Eva D.

The Voki Team

Students: Ask for Help in Class

November 11, 2014

AskForHelp_Logo_2Asking for help can be very hard but it is very important if you want to learn more in class. Knowing how to ask for help is a very important skill to have. You may have a question about last night’s homework or something you want your teacher to clarify in class. Here are some helpful tips on how you can ask for help in class:

  • It is ok to ask for help.

Remember that it is ok to ask for help. You are in class to learn so asking questions can help you learn more.  If you are afraid to ask your teacher to help, try to ask your classmate to help! If you sit back and not ask for help, you are only hurting yourself.

  • Don’t be afraid.

Being afraid to ask for help is a major problem for students. They are afraid that other students would tease them. Never be embarrassed and do not worry about other students judging you. If you have a personal problem, talk to your teacher privately during a break and they will do their best to help you.

 

Voki Tip: If you are afraid to ask your teacher for help during class, send him/her an email afterwards. You can even create a Voki that can help you out!

Until next time,

Eva D.

The Voki Team

1560505_10152516453053764_8553617582835278394_nBio: Eva is the Community Manager for Voki and is part of the Marketing Team at Oddcast. She enjoys playing the piano and knitting on her free time. (She’s also a Rubik’s cube master!) She loves to hear your feedback and comments for Voki!

Helping Students with ADHD/ADD

November 6, 2014

Impulse-ControlWhat is ADHD/ADD? It stands for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder/Attention Deficit Disorder. It affects about 3-5% of children and adults in the United States. Some characteristics of ADHD/ADD include:

  • Inattentiveness, but not hyperactive or impulsive
  • Hyperactive and impulsive, but can concentrate
  • Inattentive, hyperactive, and impulsive

You might notice one of your students who may have ADHD/ADD. You can make a difference in your student’s life by helping them. Here are some ways that you can start:

Have seating arrangements.

If you know your student can be distracted when they site near a window or door, move their seat to a different location. It might be helpful to sit your student with ADHD/ADD in front of your desk to help them focus. It is also useful if you arrange your classroom seating in rows instead of sitting around tables or facing one another.

Provide clear and concise instructions.

Give instructions one at a time. If the instructions are complex, break it down into smaller parts. Also, you can have several other students repeat your instructions to give the student with ADHD/ADD the opportunity to hear it. Make sure that the assignment is not too long or too difficult because they might avoid doing it.

Work with parents.

It is best if you partner up with their parents to make sure that their child is ready to learn in the classroom. Ask parents to communication with you regularly about the problems their child experiences in school. Have the parents help their child organize their papers or homework during the evening and help them prepare for school next day.

If you have a student that has ADHD/ADD in your class, let us know how you help them!

Until next time,

Eva D.

The Voki Team

1560505_10152516453053764_8553617582835278394_nBio: Eva is the Community Manager for Voki and is part of the Marketing Team at Oddcast. She enjoys playing the piano and knitting on her free time. (She’s also a Rubik’s cube master!) She loves to hear your feedback and comments for Voki!

Quick and Easy way to Use Technology in Classroom

November 4, 2014

student-with-ipad-technology-in-the-classroom1If you’re one of those teachers who want to challenge yourself this school year, you may want to start using technology in class. Technology can help improve student involvement and a great way to keep them engaged. So we put together some quick and easy way that you can start using technology in class!

Create a class website

One of the benefits of a creating a website is the increased communication between you, students and parents. A class website can be anything from an online bulletin board to a class blog with class materials. If you want to start building your own class website, here is a list of platforms that you may want to try out.

Create a class game using PowerPoint

Many teachers use PowerPoint to create fun review games based on famous game shows, like “Jeopardy!” And “Who Wants to be a Millionaire?” It is up to you to be creative. Not only does it get your students excited about reviews, it can help them figure out what they need to study! Here are some templates that you can use for these games: PowerPoint Games and PowerPoint Review Games Template.

Use social media

If you’re more tech-savvy, you can create a class Twitter account or class Instagram account. Many teachers are leveraging these tools to be more involved with their students and their parents. Check out some of the ways you can use Twitter and Instagram.

No matter how you plan to use technology in class, always remember to have fun!

Until next time,

Eva D.

The Voki Team

1560505_10152516453053764_8553617582835278394_nBio: Eva is the Community Manager for Voki and is part of the Marketing Team at Oddcast. She enjoys playing the piano and knitting on her free time. (She’s also a Rubik’s cube master!) She loves to hear your feedback and comments for Voki!

Help stop bullying (for students)!

October 30, 2014

tumblr_mlxavfpnWL1qcxu82o1_500What is bullying? It is any hurtful behavior that can harm another person. Bullying can take my different forms.  Some common examples of bullying are name-calling, teasing, telling, pushing, spreading rumors, and cyberbullying. It can cause negative physical, school, and mental health issues. So here’s how you can help prevent bullying in school!

  1. Treat everyone with respect.

Do not be mean to other students. Before you say or do something that could hurt someone, stop and think if you should do it. If you feel like being mean to someone, try to play a game, watch TV, or talk to someone to take your mind off it. If you don’t know how to be nice to others, talk to an adult and ask them to help you. Remember that everyone is different. Also, if you think you bullied someone before, apologize.

 

  1. If you are being bullied…

If you are being bullied, here’s what you can do. Look at the bully and tell him/her to stop in a calm, clear voice. Or you can laugh it off because it can catch the bully off guard. Do not fight back. It is best if you walk away and stay safe. If you think you are being bullied, talk to an adult that you trust. They can try to help you stop the bullying.

 

If you see someone being bullied, talk to an adult. It can be a parent, teacher, or another adult you can trust. You need to let them know when bad things are happening so they can help. Remember to be kind to the student being bullied. Show that you care by sitting with them at lunch or on the bust. Try to talk to them during school or hang out with them after school.

You can always stop bullying, find out more here: http://www.flipthescriptnow.org/students

Until next time,

Eva D.

The Voki Team

1560505_10152516453053764_8553617582835278394_nBio: Eva is the Community Manager for Voki and is part of the Marketing Team at Oddcast. She enjoys playing the piano and knitting on her free time. (She’s also a Rubik’s cube master!) She loves to hear your feedback and comments for Voki!

Top 3 Ways Teachers Can Stop Bullies

October 28, 2014

October is National BullyingBullying Prevention Month. As you know, bullying is a major problem in school. Students who are bullied can experience negative physical, school, and mental health issues. It affects everyone: the person being bullied, the bully, and the witnesses. Whether it is the classroom, the cafeteria, library, on the playground, or bathroom, it is up to the teachers to help prevent bullying in school.

Here, Voki have 3 tips that can help you and other school administrators prevent bullying from happening in school.

 

  1. Help your students understand bullying.

Explain to your students what bullying is and how to stand up to it safely. Tell them that bullying is unacceptable. Encourage them to speak to a trusted adult if they see someone being bullies or if they are bullied. Give your students tips on how to stand up to bullies and if it doesn’t work, walk away.

 

  1. Create a safe and supportive environment.

You should create a classroom culture of inclusion and respect that welcomes all students. Make sure that your students interact safely. Find out where students can have a higher risk of bullying, such as bathrooms, playgrounds, and cafeteria. This is where there is little or no adult supervision. Establish ground rules in in class so students can help create this positive and respectful environment. Always remember that you are a role model for them so you must follow the rules yourself.

 

  1. Stop Bullying on the spot.

If you spot bullying in school, stop it immediately. Do not ignore it and do think that they can work it out without help. If another teacher is needed, do not hesitate to ask. Talk to the students individually and do not force other students to say what they saw publicly. Model respectful behavior when you intervene because you are their role model.

 

For more information on how to prevent bullying, visit www.stopbullying.gov.

Until next time,

Eva D.
The Voki Team

1560505_10152516453053764_8553617582835278394_nBio: Eva is the Community Manager for Voki and is part of the Marketing Team at Oddcast. She enjoys playing the piano and knitting on her free time. (She’s also a Rubik’s cube master!) She loves to hear your feedback and comments for Voki!

 

Voki Guest Blogger: Kimberly Munoz

October 23, 2014

As a Tech Apps teacher, I was always looking for relevant web tools that my students could use in my class and in others. Voki is a great educational technology tool because it teaches technology skills, and engages students in the content the teacher is presenting. If you’ve never used Voki before, it is simply a website that allows you to create a talking avatar! I’ve used Voki in my classroom for the past several years and my students loved it every time!

 

The most popular project I did with my students, using Voki, was the character analysis they were required to do over one person in the book, “The Giver.” It was a cross-curricular project between me and another English teacher. The students had to choose an avatar and edit their features to resemble the character as close as possible. Then, they were suppose to make the avatar explain who their character was in the book and what part they played in the story. Here is the link to their finished products. I love that you can publish their work just like I did here! http://greetingsbyvoki.wikispaces.com/

 

You can embed Voki’s on blogs and webpages. I’ve taught my students to create welcome messages to post on their blogs. It’s a great way to personalize content and show a bit of personality as well, which is why I think students love this tool so much! If you haven’t tried Voki yet, you are missing out!

 

Kimberly Munoz

Instructional Technologist

Franklin ISD

 

15 years teaching experience

@techmunoz

 

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